nowwwh

2014

Bas Van WieringenCircle, 2011Drawing by a human body


who-wore-it-better:

Kevin Bewersdorf Net Art Diagram  ::  MTAA Simple Net Art Diagram



fernandezmiron:

Helmut Smits - As Far as I Can Reach (Aura)2011. Variable dimensions.Spray painting a wall as far as I can reach without moving my feet.Pintando una pared con spray todo lo lejos que puedo sin mover los pies.

William Wegman’s first GIF. (via Colossal)

  • Dazed Digital:   [...] how would a website be displayed or exist in a public collection in a museum?
  • Lindsay Howard:   Actually, there’s an interesting instance of this; the Cooper-Hewitt National Design museum just acquired its first piece of code. Their curator wrote a long essay about their plans for preservation, which is to release that code and make it open-source. So their idea for preservation is to put it back into the social space and allow the network to preserve it – by modifying it, you’re keeping it alive. (In: Zing Tsjeng, "How To Sell a Gif": http://bit.ly/19ZYL5S)


Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences. (Roy Ascott’s phrase.) That solves a lot of problems: we don’t have to argue whether photographs are art, or whether performances are art, or whether Carl Andre’s bricks or Andrew Serranos’s piss or Little Richard’s ‘Long Tall Sally’ are art, because we say, ‘Art is something that happens, a process, not a quality, and all sorts of things can make it happen.’ … [W]hat makes a work of art ‘good’ for you is not something that is already ‘inside’ it, but something that happens inside you — so the value of the work lies in the degree to which it can help you have the kind of experience that you call art.


Limitations, somewhat haphazardly imposed, are a great thing. You know the famous remark of Robert Frost about free-verse? That it’s like playing tennis with the net down? For me, the limitations… are playing tennis with the net up. If you erect one of these impediments to progress, you have to come up with a work- around, and the work-around often causes you to think in new ways about your subject. In a way, the impediments cause metaphor to happen, and I often suddenly think anew when I am forced into metaphor and analogy to say what I was going to say in a more direct way.
— Rick Moody (via mttbll)

(Fuente: electricliterature.com, vía jacobwren)


Barbara Kruger, Business as Usual, 1987.



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